Android Version and Device Stats for LQ Native App II

Now that the native LQ android app is in the 5-10,000 download range, I thought I’d post an update to this previous post on the topic of Android version and device stats. See this post if you’re interested in browser and OS stats for the main LQ site.

Platform Version
Android 4.4 29.54%
Android 4.1 20.42%
Android 4.0.3-4.0.4 13.59%
Android 4.2 12.49%
Android 2.3.3-2.3.7 11.70%
Android 4.3 9.27%
Android 2.2 1.96%

 

Device
Google Nexus 7 (grouper) 6.13%
Samsung Galaxy S3 (m0) 3.53%
Google Nexus 5 2.75%
Samsung Galaxy S2 2.28%
Samsung Galaxy S3 2.20%
Google Nexus 7 (flo) 2.12%
Samsung Galaxy S4 1.81%
Google Nexus 4 1.73%
Samsung Galaxy Tab2 1.49%

So, how has Android fragmentation changed since my original post in February of 2012? At first blush it may appear that it’s actually more fragmented from a device version perspective. Previously, the top two versions accounted for over 70% of all installs, while now that number is just 50%. That’s misleading though, as almost 90% of all installs are now on a 4.x variant. This clustering around a much more polished version of Android, along with the fact that Google has broken so much functionality out into Google Play Services, means that from a developers perspective things are significantly better than they were during the time-frame of my previous post. I will admit I’m surprised by the age of the top devices, but they may be specific to the LQ crowd (and it’s no surprise to me to see the Nexus 5 as the second most popular phone).

–jeremy

Bad Voltage Season 1 Episode 19: Fedora Murder Trial

From the Bad Voltage site:

The whole team return (remarkably) to speak, weirdly, only about things beginning with the letter F. Myself, Bryan Lunduke, Jono Bacon and Stuart Langridge present Bad Voltage, with the following “F-ing” things:

  • Fire Phone: Amazon release a phone, and we decide whether it’s exciting or execrable
  • Firefox OS: the Mozilla project’s phone OS, reviewed by Stuart and discussed by everybody
  • Freshmeat: the late-90s web store of software for Linux has finally closed its doors. Reminiscence, combined with some thoughts on how and why the world has moved on
  • Fedora Project Leader: Matthew Miller, the newly-appointed leader of the Fedora Linux project, speaks about the direction that distribution is planning, working with large communities, and whether his job should be decided by a Thunderdome-style trial by combat
  • err… our Fabulous community: we catch up with what’s going on

Listen to: 1×19: Fedora Murder Trial

As mentioned here, Bad Voltage is a new project I’m proud to be a part of. From the Bad Voltage site: Every two weeks Bad Voltage delivers an amusing take on technology, Open Source, politics, music, and anything else we think is interesting, as well as interviews and reviews. Do note that Bad Voltage is in no way related to LinuxQuestions.org, and unlike LQ it will be decidedly NSFW. That said, head over to the Bad Voltage website, take a listen and let us know what you think.

–jeremy

LinuxQuestions.org Turns Fourteen

I’m extremely proud to announce that exactly fourteen years ago today I made my very first post at LinuxQuestions.org. As has become tradition, here’s a quick post looking back on the past year and ahead to the next. 5,169,549 posts and 532,989 members (899,500 members have actually registered, but we have a very active pruning policy for members who have never posted) does not even begin to tell the story. As I’ve said previously, the community that has not only grown but flourished at LQ is both astounding and humbling. I’d like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation and feedback. I’d also like to thank the mod team, whose level-headed decisions and dedication have been a cornerstone of the site’s success. As part of our birthday celebration, we’ll be giving away Contributing Member updates, and even some LQ Merchandise. Visit this thread for more details.

This year has been another year of solid growth, both for LQ and The Questions Network. While we once again delayed the code update that we had planned for LQ, both ChromeOSQuestions.org and AndroidQuestions.org are running the latest platform. We have a couple items to work out, but LQ should be moving to the the new platform some time this year. Once that happens, we have some exciting new features and functionality we think you’ll enjoy. If you think there is anything we can do to improve, don’t hesitate to let us know.

–jeremy

Bad Voltage Season 1 Episode 16: Forgotten to be Right

From the Bad Voltage site:

Myself, Bryan Lunduke, Jono Bacon, and Stuart Langridge present Bad Voltage, the greatest podcast in the history of this or any other universe. In this episode:

Listen to: 1×16: Forgotten to be Right

As mentioned here, Bad Voltage is a new project I’m proud to be a part of. From the Bad Voltage site: Every two weeks Bad Voltage delivers an amusing take on technology, Open Source, politics, music, and anything else we think is interesting, as well as interviews and reviews. Do note that Bad Voltage is in no way related to LinuxQuestions.org, and unlike LQ it will be decidedly NSFW. That said, head over to the Bad Voltage website, take a listen and let us know what you think.

–jeremy

Bad Voltage Season 1 Episode 15: Why Dear Watson

Myself, Bryan Lunduke, Jono Bacon, and Stuart Langridge present Bad Voltage, :

  • Bryan gave his yearly “Linux Sucks” talk at LinuxFest Northwest, and the rest of us take issue with his approach, his arguments, his data sources, and his general sense of being
  • The XBox 360: reviewed as a TV set-top box, not as a gaming console
  • The up and coming elementary OS: is it any good, and what do we think of it?
  • Our discussion of elementary OS raised a number of questions: Daniel Foré, leader of the project, talks about the goals of the OS and answers our queries
  • Community recap: your emails and forum posts and happenings in the Bad Voltage community

Listen to: 1×15: Why Dear Watson

As mentioned here, Bad Voltage is a new project I’m proud to be a part of. From the Bad Voltage site: Every two weeks Bad Voltage delivers an amusing take on technology, Open Source, politics, music, and anything else we think is interesting, as well as interviews and reviews. Do note that Bad Voltage is in no way related to LinuxQuestions.org, and unlike LQ it will be decidedly NSFW. That said, head over to the Bad Voltage website, take a listen and let us know what you think.

–jeremy

Bad Voltage Season 1 Episode 14: Cloudy Donkey Mascots

Myself, Bryan Lunduke, Jono Bacon, and Stuart Langridge present Bad Voltage, in which the cloud shows up a lot this week, in the following ways:

  • Personal cloud storage: what do we use, what do we like, and what do we think? Companies, personal clouds, servers, tarsnap and Dropbox
  • Christian Schaller, who manages the team at Red Hat producing their “Fedora Workstation” concept, wrote up what “Workstation” is and now comes to answer questions about it
  • Breaking Down the Bullshit: we look at “the cloud” as a whole. What does it mean? And why?
  • I review the Pebble watch: as one of its original Kickstarter backers, I’ve now had the Pebble for long enough to form an opinion
  • Community recap: your emails and forum posts and happenings in the Bad Voltage community

Listen to: 1×14: Cloudy Donkey Mascots

As mentioned here, Bad Voltage is a new project I’m proud to be a part of. From the Bad Voltage site: Every two weeks Bad Voltage delivers an amusing take on technology, Open Source, politics, music, and anything else we think is interesting, as well as interviews and reviews. Do note that Bad Voltage is in no way related to LinuxQuestions.org, and unlike LQ it will be decidedly NSFW. That said, head over to the Bad Voltage website, take a listen and let us know what you think.

–jeremy

Pebble Smartwatch Review

This review was originally done for Bad Voltage, but I figured it may also be of interest to my general readers.

In Season 1 Episode 13 of Bad Voltage, we covered the topic of wearables. One device that came up in that episode was the Pebble watch. For those who are unfamiliar with the device, it’s a first generation smartwatch that has an e-paper display and an ARM Cortex-M3 processor. It was originally funded via kickstarter, where the project hit over 10 million dollars of funding based on a goal of just $100,000. I was one of the initial backers, who got a Jet Black Pebble for just $99. With its fairly low price point, the watch is admittedly pretty basic from an aesthetics perspective. The rubber watch band, for example, is certainly not my favorite. The watchface itself, while plastic, is sleek and well constructed and the e-paper display is quite usable. The battery lasts for around a week, depending on usage, and the device is even water resistant, meaning it can be fully submerged in water or worn while running in the rain. It connects to iPhone and Android smartphones using Bluetooth and can alert you with a silent vibration and on screen notification to incoming calls, emails, text messages, weather alerts, sports scores, calendar events and more. You can also select from a wide variety of watchfaces. Some of the watchfaces are extremely well done and while simple, this is one of my favorite aspects of the watch.

From a customization perspective, that’s really just the beginning though as the watch can also be loaded with apps. Cyclists can use Pebble as a bike computer, accessing the GPS on their smartphone to display speed, distance and pace data. You can use the music control app to play, pause or skip tracks on your phone with the touch of a button. You can use the device to control your GoPro camera or nest thermostat, and there’s even a Freecaddie app that works as a golf rangefinder.

The Pebble can receive simple alerts and notifications from “if this then that” or via a web-facing RESTFUL endpoint. There is also a C-based SDK. Basically you can send anything that would have been a push notification directly to the device and the device can send data from the accelerometer and buttons back up to the Internet. The app ecosystem is fairly new, but some interesting 3rd party apps are already starting to appear, with services like Pandora, RunKeeper, Foursquare and Yelp jumping into the fray.

For those who didn’t like the look or construction of the original Pebble, which is still available with an MSRP of $150, the next generation Pebble, the Pebble Steel, is already available. As the name indicates, the new device is made of brushed or matte stainless steel and comes with either a leather or metal band. The watchface itself is both larger and higher quality and now comes with Gorilla glass and a notification LED. Overall the new Pebble Steel looks significantly nicer but does so at a higher cost of $250.

So, what’s the Bad Voltage verdict? At $99 I have to say I’m pleased with the device. To be fair, the new app store has certainly had some hiccups, and some of the apps are either a bit buggy or sound more useful than they actually end up being. The largest disappointment is probably that you can only have eight watchfaces or apps on the device at any given time, which is not nearly enough. But, for a first generation device that cost less than a hundred dollars I think it was a bargain. The new Pebble Steel looks to be a nice iteration, but whether it’s worth $250 is likely a matter of personal preference… so I leave that decision to the listener.

–jeremy
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