Bad Voltage Season 1 Episode 4: Fat Drone Backups

Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon and myself (Bryan Lunduke is unable to make it again, although we do of course hope that he recovers from whatever horrific disease he’s contracted) bring you:

  • Open Source Health: are the open source community more unhealthy than most? Perhaps the trend for health-related gadgets will save us
  • Review: Stuart talks about Ender’s Game, the film, the book, and the author
  • Chris Anderson, CEO of 3dRobotics, ex-editor of Wired, and author, talks about his current venture, creating pilotless autonomous “drones” and what they might mean for Amazon Prime Air, agriculture, and society at large
  • How do the team actually back up their stuff? Surprisingly, we all actually do (as should you), but how do we do it?
  • Your feedback: video podcasting, Bitcoin, new phone OSes, and pod love

And now… Bad Voltage.

–jeremy

Bad Voltage Season 1 Episode 3: Hear My Lung

In our third episode, your hosts Jono Bacon, Stuart Langridge, and myself (our compadre Bryan Lunduke is away cavorting around Europe) bring you discussion, argument, and amusement on:

  • We delve into the new Playstation 4 and XBox One consoles and discuss whether this is the next generation of gaming, or a rehash of the same-old-same-old
  • Review: I provide an in-depth review of Google’s new Nexus 5 phone
  • We talk about biohacking and discuss what it is, what people are working on, the implications of the technology, and whether it is a good thing in the first place
  • Interview: in this episode we interview prominent kernel hacker, Greg Kroah-Hartman, about life as a kernel hacker, the pressure of working on such a core piece of technology, and his physical relationship with Linus Torvalds
  • We had a bucketload of letters, so we read out our favorites, and share the very best dirty haikus

Go and check out the show here

–jeremy

Good Listening, Bad Voltage

What do you get when you combine an ardent but realistic Open Source evangelist, a bearded heavy metal community manager, an author/Linux game creator and a raconteur web developer who all have a modicum of podcasting experience? You get Bad Voltage; a new project I’m proud to be a part of. From the Bad Voltage site: Every two weeks Bad Voltage delivers an amusing take on technology, Open Source, politics, music, and anything else we think is interesting, as well as interviews and reviews. The show is presented by Jono Bacon, Jeremy Garcia, Stuart Langridge, and Bryan Lunduke. We’ve just released the first show and are keen to get any feedback you may have. We’ve been working behind the scenes on this for a little while now and I think this has the potential to be a genuinely great show. Do note that Bad Voltage is in no way related to LinuxQuestions.org, and unlike LQ it will be decidedly NSFW. That said, head over to the Bad Voltage website, take a listen and let us know what you think.

–jeremy

LinuxQuestions.org Turns Thirteen

Another year, another woeful lack of blog posts. I’m extremely proud to announce that exactly thirteen years ago yesterday I made my very first post at LinuxQuestions.org. As has become tradition, here’s a quick post looking back on the past year and ahead to the next. 4,957,366 posts and 499,844 registered members (730,795 members have actually registered, but we have a very active pruning policy for members who have never posted) does not even begin to tell the story. The community that has grown and flourished at LQ is both astounding and humbling. I’d like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation, dedication and feedback. I’d also like to thank the dedicated mod team, whose level-headed decisions have been a cornerstone of the site’s success. As part of our birthday celebration, we’ll be giving away Contributing Member updates, LQ Merchandise and even a gratis pass to OSCON 2013 in Portland. Stay tuned for more details.

This year has been another year of solid growth, both for LQ and The Questions Network. We recently launched ChromeOSQuestions.org, which joined AndroidQuestions.org and LQ. While we delayed the code update that we had planned for LQ, both CQ and AQ are running the latest platform. We have a couple items to work out, but LQ should be moving to the the new platform some time this year. Once that happens, we have some exciting new features and functionality we think you’ll enjoy. Thanks again to all members for your participation, dedication and feedback. If you think there is anywhere we can improve, don’t hesitate to let us know.

–jeremy

Happy New Year & Browser and OS stats for 2012

I’d like to wish everyone a happy new year on behalf of the entire LQ team. 2012 has been another great year for LQ and we have quite a few exciting developments in store for 2013, including a major code update that we originally had planned for late 2012.

Unfortunately, 2012 has been another quiet year from a blogging perspective, but I do regularly post to the LQ twitter account. Posting more lengthy commentary here is something I’ll try to be more cognizant of this year.

As has become tradition, here are the browser and OS statistics for the main LQ site for all of 2012 (2011 stats for comparison).

Browsers
Firefox 46.47%
Chrome 33.27%
Internet Explorer 11.66%
Safari 4.02%
Opera 2.64%
Android Browser 0.69%

Firefox usage at LQ continues to decline and now represents less than half of all pageviews, while Chrome usage continues to increase and now represents more than a third of all pageviews. Note that Konqueror completely fell out of the top 10, representing just 0.09% of all pageviews.

Operating Systems
Windows 53.56%
Linux 35.54%
Macintosh 8.26%
Android .95%
iOS .64%

Windows and Macintosh usage increased for the second straight year, while Linux usage is once again down slightly. Android usage almost hit one full percent.

I’d also like to take this time to thank each and every LQ member. You are what make the site great; without you, we simply wouldn’t exist. I’d like to once again thank the LQ mod team, whose continued dedication ensures that things run as smoothly as they do. Don’t forget to vote in the 2012 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards, which recently opened.

–jeremy

LinuxQuestions.org Turns Twelve

I’m extremely proud to announce that exactly twelve years ago yesterday I made my very first post at LinuxQuestions.org. As has become tradition, here’s a quick post looking back on the past year and ahead to the next. 4,693,050 posts and 469,470 registered members (659,324 members have actually registered, but we have a very active pruning policy for members who have never posted) does not even begin to tell the story. The community that has grown and flourished at LQ is both astounding and humbling. I’d like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation, dedication and feedback. I’d also like to thank the dedicated mod team, whose level-headed decisions have been a cornerstone of the site’s success.

To say that feedback has been absolutely critical to our success is an understatement. It would be impossible to enumerate the features we’ve added or changes we’ve made as a direct result of member feedback. With that in mind, I’d like to use this thread to collect as much feedback as possible about LQ. What are we doing well and where can we improve? What should we be doing differently? As part of our birthday celebration, we’ll be giving away Contributing Member updates, LQ Merchandise and even a gratis pass to OSCON 2012 in Portland. Stay tuned for more details.

You may be wondering what’s next for LQ. I’m happy to say that after twelve years, our mission remains as unequivocally unchanged now as it was when I started the site; to be the absolute best resource we can be for the Linux and Open Source community. We have a large code upgrade coming to LQ in the near future, which will bring it in line with the other Questions Network site, AndroidQuestions.org. The new code will bring many long awaiting features, including a much improved search. It will also allow us to iterate faster and add functionality that will improve usability for members and mods alike. After we’re sure the new release is stable, we’ll look at whether or not it makes sense to add any new sections to the site. We’ll also explore the possibility of adding new sites to The Questions Network. Feedback on both, including possible topics for the additional site(s), is very much encouraged.

–jeremy

Android Version and Device Stats for LQ Native App – Is Fragmentation an Issue?

Now that the native LQ android app has a few thousand installs (and since members really seem to enjoy LQ-related statistics posts), I’ve decided to post the platform version and device statistics for the app.

Platform Version
Android 2.3.3+ 48.1%
Android 2.2 24.4%
Android 2.1 7.1%
Android 3.1 2.1%
Android 4.0.3 1.9%
Android 3.2 1.5%
Android 4.0 1.5%
Device
Samsung Galaxy S2 8.0%
HTC Desire HD 6.0%
Motorola Droid X 5.4%
Samsung Galaxy S (GT-I9000) 4.6%
HTC Thunderbolt 2.5%
HTC G2 2.5%
Samsung Nexus S 2.5%
Asus EeePad Transformer TF101 2.4%
HTC Desire 2.4%
Samsung Galaxy Tab 2.2%

So, is Android fragmentation a problem? Well, I think this is an issue with multiple facets that get conflated into a single issue.

First you have the version aspect. I have to admit I’m surprised by just how many Android handsets are running 2.2 and *gulp* 2.1 (which was released over two years ago; a veritable eon in mobile terms). Gingerbread 2.3 and Ice Cream Sandwich 4.0 are huge improvements over previous versions of Android. While I think it’s a shame that so many users are stuck on older versions, I think this part is one that vendors and Google are working on and one that will improve significantly moving forward. Android was revving quickly in the earlier days and some of the hardware just couldn’t run future versions. Couple that with that fact that many vendors were new to Android and new to an ecosystem of this nature, and you had an initial learning curve that I think was destine to result in a suboptimal experience for end users. Fast forward to today and the press releases and public statements from vendors about which phones would be upgraded to ICS, along with time lines in many cases, and I think it’s clear this will become less and less of a problem.

Next you have the device aspect. This one is a bit trickier. The number one device here, the Samsung Galaxy S2 (which I incidentally own and really like), only represents 8% of all devices. The Android handset market is extremely varied. Not only that, it’s varied in many aspects; from screen size and quality, to device capabilities, to carrier restrictions… the list is almost endless. Unlike say, iOS and related apps, which only have to support a very finite number of configurations, Android and related apps have to deal with an almost endless number of combinations. This is an issue that Google is also working on, and has made significants strides with, but one that I think may take a little more time to figure out completely. It’s an issue they have to figure out if they want Android to be a long term success though, so I’d say there is a good chance they will succeed.

So, is Android fragmentation a problem? I’d say much less so than in the past. More importantly, I think it’s an issue that Google is well aware of, is working on intently, and will eventually mitigate to a large extent.

–jeremy

PS. If you have an Android-related question, don’t forget to visit LQ’s new sister site: AndroidQuestions.org.

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